Archive for Jan, 2018

By Dr. Travis Bradberry

True confidence—as opposed to the false confidence people project to mask their insecurities—has a look all its own. One thing is certain: truly confident people always have the upper hand over the doubtful and the skittish because they inspire others and they make things happen.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t—you’re right. – Henry Ford

Ford’s notion that your mentality has a powerful effect on your ability to succeed is seen in the results of a recent study at the University of Melbourne that showed that confident people earn higher wages and get promoted more quickly than anyone else.

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By Daniel Goleman

When champion golfer Rory McIlroy steps up to hit the ball down the fairway, he doesn’t use his putter. He chooses a club that will give the ball the power and distance he needs. If that shot goes astray into a sand trap, Rory’s wedge will punch the ball up onto the green. Then, he’ll pull the putter out of his bag to finesse the final shot into the hole.

What do golf clubs have to do with leadership? The mark of an effective professional in any field is that they know how to skillfully use the appropriate tool for each situation. In my Harvard Business Review article, “Leadership That Gets Results,” I used the analogy of a golf pro choosing clubs for different shots to describe the four styles of resonant leadership. Like a seasoned golfer selecting the correct club, an effective leader uses the style that will get the job done.

What is Resonant Leadership?

Resonance means reinforcing sound by moving on the same wavelength. Leaders have the power to impact the emotional states of people around them. They can have a positive effect, pulling everyone onto the same upbeat wavelength. Or, they can create dissonance, where their negativity bumps up against the emotions of others. Resonant leaders use their emotional intelligence to direct the feelings to help a group meet its goals.

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

There are some things you simply never want to say at work.

These phrases carry special power: they have an uncanny ability to make you look bad even when the words are true.

Worst of all, there’s no taking them back once they slip out.

I’m not talking about shocking slips of the tongue, off-color jokes, or politically incorrect faux pas. These aren’t the only ways to make yourself look bad.

Often it’s the subtle remarks—the ones that paint us as incompetent and unconfident—that do the most damage.

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

Even the most likeable and well-mannered among us can still look like jerks in an email. Writing an email that comes across just like you do in person is a fine art.

During a conversation, you adjust your tone, facial expression, gestures and posture in order to fit the mood of what you’re conveying. You do this because people tend to be much more responsive to how you say things than to what you actually say.

Email strips a conversation bare. It’s efficient, but it turns otherwise easy interactions into messy misinterpretations. Without facial expressions and body posture to guide your message, people look at each word you type as an indicator of tone and mood.

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By Melissa Welby, MD

Do What You are Afraid of!

If you didn’t have anxiety what would you do differently? How would you live your life? Without anxiety would you pursue different careers or hobbies? Would you try to get that promotion you deserve even if it requires travel and public speaking? Would you fly in a plane or go back to school to complete your degree? Would you drive on the highway so you can take road trips? Would you go to a party at a friends house? Or a work gathering? Would you go to a store instead of ordering everything online? Let me tell you how to deal with anxiety and how to stop anxiety from affecting your life.

Anxiety can be healthy!

Anxiety can be a healthy and normal feeling. It’s a motivator! Anxiety is our body’s way to remind us we need to pay attention. If we are anxious about something we may try harder to be prepared. We may study a few more hours until we are confident we can pass the test or use extra caution when doing something that we perceive has some risk. Anxiety can be a helpful tool for our success and survival.

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

We’ve all heard the adage, “People don’t leave bad jobs; they leave bad bosses.” It makes great fodder for after-work gripe sessions, but is there really any data to back the claim up? As it turns out, there’s a ton.

In one study, 61% of those working for bad bosses said they were looking for another job, while just 27% of those working for good bosses were considering alternate employment. And here’s one that’s really startling: 65% of people with bad bosses said they’ve sometimes misrepresented the truth at work, compared to only 19% of those with good bosses. Just as great bosses bring out the best in us, bad bosses bring out the worst.

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