Leadership

By Daniel Goleman

When champion golfer Rory McIlroy steps up to hit the ball down the fairway, he doesn’t use his putter. He chooses a club that will give the ball the power and distance he needs. If that shot goes astray into a sand trap, Rory’s wedge will punch the ball up onto the green. Then, he’ll pull the putter out of his bag to finesse the final shot into the hole.

What do golf clubs have to do with leadership? The mark of an effective professional in any field is that they know how to skillfully use the appropriate tool for each situation. In my Harvard Business Review article, “Leadership That Gets Results,” I used the analogy of a golf pro choosing clubs for different shots to describe the four styles of resonant leadership. Like a seasoned golfer selecting the correct club, an effective leader uses the style that will get the job done.

 

What is Resonant Leadership?

Resonance means reinforcing sound by moving on the same wavelength. Leaders have the power to impact the emotional states of people around them. They can have a positive effect, pulling everyone onto the same upbeat wavelength. Or, they can create dissonance, where their negativity bumps up against the emotions of others. Resonant leaders use their emotional intelligence to direct the feelings to help a group meet its goals.

 

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

There are some things you simply never want to say at work.

These phrases carry special power: they have an uncanny ability to make you look bad even when the words are true.

Worst of all, there’s no taking them back once they slip out.

I’m not talking about shocking slips of the tongue, off-color jokes, or politically incorrect faux pas. These aren’t the only ways to make yourself look bad.

Often it’s the subtle remarks—the ones that paint us as incompetent and unconfident—that do the most damage.

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

We’ve all heard the adage, “People don’t leave bad jobs; they leave bad bosses.” It makes great fodder for after-work gripe sessions, but is there really any data to back the claim up? As it turns out, there’s a ton.

In one study, 61% of those working for bad bosses said they were looking for another job, while just 27% of those working for good bosses were considering alternate employment. And here’s one that’s really startling: 65% of people with bad bosses said they’ve sometimes misrepresented the truth at work, compared to only 19% of those with good bosses. Just as great bosses bring out the best in us, bad bosses bring out the worst.

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Mastering your money has a lot more to do with psychology and mindset than we might think.

That’s what Napoleon Hill preached in his bestselling 1937 book, “Think and Grow Rich,” the culmination of his intensive study of over 500 self-made millionaires.

Self-made millionaire Steve Siebold, who has interviewed 1,200 of the world’s wealthiest people during the past three decades, agrees. As backwards as it sounds, getting rich often has less to do with the money than the mentality, he writes in his book “How Rich People Think.”

Here are 13 mindsets of the wealthy that you could adopt today:

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By Dr. Travis Bradberry

When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it served as the missing link in a peculiar finding: people with average IQs outperform those with the highest IQs 70% of the time. This anomaly threw a massive wrench into what many people had always assumed was the sole source of success—IQ. Decades of research now point to emotional intelligence as the critical factor that sets star performers apart from the rest of the pack.

How much of an impact does emotional intelligence (EQ) have on your professional success? The short answer is: a lot! It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous result. Of all the people we’ve studied at work, we’ve found that 90% of top performers have high EQs. You can be a top performer without emotional intelligence, but the chances are slim.

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By Katherine Eion

 

Sun Tzu’s Art Of War is believed to have been written in the sixth century or 512 BCE (Before Common Era). The text is considered to be one of the Seven Military Classics in China. The work is considered poetic, in its great wisdom. Now the famed classic may be used to determine leadership qualities, as well as, strategies in business.

1. Never Lead By Force

  • “The Commander stands for the virtues of wisdom, sincerity, benevolence, courage, and strictness.”
  • “The consummate leader cultivates the moral law, and strictly adheres to method and discipline; thus it is in his power to control success.”
  • “Hence in the wise leader’s plans, considerations of advantage and of disadvantage will be blended together.”

 

2. Know The Competition

  • “Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder and crush him.’
  • “If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.”
  • “So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak.

 

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By Bill Murphy Jr. of Inc.

Some bosses are mere managers. Others are great leaders. How do you know the difference?

One way is to pay attention to the things they say. If phrases like the following come up often, you’ll know quickly which type you’re dealing with.

1. “We’re Screwed”

“Game over man!” If you ever saw the movie Aliens, you understand that when the leader loses faith—and lets his team know about it—there’s almost no chance of success. (Warning in case you’re playing this at work without headphones: there’s some R-rated language in this clip.)

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By John Eades

It is critically important to know the truth. When we don’t know the truth, false ideas and beliefs take over. Before long, we start to believe something so far from reality it’s tough to come back. These fabrications can come from a variety of places; our parents, society, a crazy uncle, a former teacher or mentor, etc. While I’m not asking you to fact check everything you’ve ever been told, I don’t want an untruth to keep you from pursuing the most fulfilling thing a professional can do; leadership.

There are myths built up in modern professionals minds that hinder them from taking steps toward becoming a leader. I’ve outlined some of the most common fallacies surrounding leadership that professionals love to believe, but couldn’t be more wrong about.

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It’s natural to wonder “What’s next?”—or, more accurately, when you’ll climb to the next rung on the ladder in your career. In an ideal world, your boss would just tell you whenever you’re making moves in the right direction.

But it’s not an ideal world, and for a variety of reasons, a manager doesn’t always tell a direct report he or she is a rising leader. So, you may have to find other signs that your company believes in you and your potential for growth. Sure, being assigned a leadership coach or getting invited to attend a specialized program for management are obvious indicators. But there are other, more subtle signs that might be equally telling.

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By Jo Miller

There’s never been a better time to develop your leadership skills. According to Deloitte’s 2014 Millennial Survey, Millennials will comprise 75% of the global workforce by 2025.

Think about that statistic for a moment, because the implications are huge: Within 10 years, Baby Boomers will have all but completed the handoff of leadership responsibilities to members of Generations X and Y. If you’re interested in moving into management, now is the ideal time to raise your hand and take the lead.

Why now?

In anticipation of this global demographic shift, many companies are developing high-potential programs to accelerate the development of their up-and-coming leaders. Deloitte, for example, has a program called NextGen, which aims to cultivate future leaders.

I turned to Monica O’Reilly, a principal at Deloitte & Touche LLP and Chief Talent Officer for the firm’s advisory practice, to learn more about NextGen and who makes a great candidate for the program.

O’Reilly, who is a NextGen graduate herself, explains five ways to stand out and be recognized as high-potential. Even if your company doesn’t have a program like NextGen, incorporating these tips into your work life will demonstrate your abilities to the people who can take your career to the next level.

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